Cherry Grove Farm |  Classes/Tours

Our Double-Header Cheesemaking Class!

Ricotta! Make your own ricotta using our grass-fed raw milk.  Participate in the process of “re-cooking” (the literal Italian translation of ricotta) milk to form this sweet, delicate cheese.  Learn how to make it in your own at home, plus lots of information about how to use ricotta in new and interesting ways!

Mozzarella! In this fun and informative class we show you how milk is transformed into curds and then guide you through the steps to stretch the curds into mozzarella.

Price:  $65 per person per double header class.

Space is limited!  Due to high demand, we request that full payment is made at time of reservation to hold your spot.  Class price includes a Cherry Grove thermal bag  as well as recipes to make the cheeses at home.

To register please call 609-895-1502 or email us at cherrygrovefarmevents@gmail.com.

for more info visit: Cherry Grove Farm |  Classes/Tours.

I’m Back on the Radio, with My Own Show! | Dine With Pat

old fashioned

Breaking News: I’m Back on the Radio, with My Own Show! I’m thrilled to announce the debut of my radio show Dining Today with Pat Tanner! It premieres this Sunday, November 3rd from 2 to 3 pm on 920 The Voice, a new AM station in Central NJ. Joining me as my first guests are Chris Walsh of River Horse Brewing and Rosie Saferstein, whose njmonthly.com column, “Table Hopping with Rosie,” is a prime source for NJ restaurant news.

read more Breaking News: I’m Back on the Radio, with My Own Show! | Dine With Pat.

 

 

Screening of Farmageddon Tonight at the East Brunswick Public Library 7:00

  • The screening will be followed by a panel discussion. Our panelists include Angela Davis,Weston A. Price Foundation Jersey City Chapter Leader; Lucia & Charlie Huebner, Owners of Beechtree Farm, and Joh McConaughy, Owner of Double Brook Farm.Americans’ right to access fresh, healthy foods of their choice is under attack. Farmageddon tells the story of small, family farms that were providing safe, healthy foods to their communities and were forced to stop, sometimes through violent action, by agents of misguided government bureaucracies, and seeks to figure out why.

    Farmageddon highlights the urgency of food freedom, encouraging farmers and consumers alike to take action to preserve individuals’ rights to access food of their choice and farmers’ rights to produce these foods safely and free from unreasonably burdensome regulations. The film serves to put policymakers and regulators on notice that there is a growing movement of people aware that their freedom to choose the foods they want is in danger, a movement that is taking action with its dollars and its voting power to protect and preserve the dwindling number of family farms that are struggling to survive.

    http://www.ebpl.org/main/polCalendarEvent.cfm?Event_Date=%7Bd+%272013-10-14%27%7D&Calendar_Code=Library&Event_Id=42582

Farmageddon

2 Jean Walling Civic Center, East Brunswick, New Jersey 08816

Harvesting Seeds – A Growing Collection | The Raíces Cultural Center Blog

It’s harvest season and our friends and seed library members are busy harvesting and saving seed.  This statement and these photos were posted September 26 by Wendy Weiner (a.k.a. The Front Yard Farmer) of Transition Monmouth, a collaborator on the Raíces Seed Library:

I was out in the garden this morning gathering seeds for our new seed library and for my own stash. This aspect of gardening is equally as important as is gathering your vegetables or fertilizing your beds. Please consider making a contribution to our Seed Library that is forming. Hold your seed and stay tuned. These 2 pictures show my growing collection and seeds yet to be thrashed and cleaned.

It’s so exciting to see such a variety of seeds being saved by our friends and participants of this project.  Please send in your seed saving photos to raices@raicesculturalcenter.org so we can feature you and your seeds in an album of local and regional seed savers.

via Harvesting Seeds – A Growing Collection | The Raíces Cultural Center Blog.

Join the March Against Monsanto, Princeton Oct. 12th 2:00 at the Whole Earth Center

 

Marelli Banner MAM

To join the march click HERE.

gmo boycott

Starting Point:
Whole Earth Center
360 Nassau Street
Princeton NJ 08540

12:00 pm-2:00pm: Music sponsored by the Whole Earth Center
A Little Bit Off : Lolly Barton (bass & harmonica), Kristin Westbrook (fiddle) Gretchen Jaeckel (mandolin & vocals), Carolyn Haines (guitar & vocals)

2:00-2:20: Welcome and speaker introductions.

Speakers at the Whole Earth Center:
Laurie Hunstman–President of the Whole Earth Center Board
Kathleen McKenna– mom
Carol Grace — Wife of Vietnam Agent Orange victim

2:20-3:00: Walk to Battlefield Monument Park
Route: http://goo.gl/maps/L386S

3:00-3:20: Speakers at Battlefield Monument Park:
Carla Díaz Stringel (Monsanto’s Corn in Mexico)
Jim Walsh Food & Water Watch
Barbara Thomas GMO-Free NJ Puppet/GMO myths & truths.
Sing-a-long: GMO Frankenfood Rag
Action plan discussion

Link to the route: http://goo.gl/maps/L386S
Twitter hashtag #mamprinceton
Global Event List: http://bit.ly/10xx8Ay
Bring drum or a pot or pan with a spoon to help make music together!http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9oAJBhNtr04
MAM NB 5/25/13 http://tinyurl.com/l8evc3v
Channel 12 MAM NB May 25, 2013:
http://newjersey.news12.com/multimedia/thousands-protest-against-monsanto-1.5341452

Please come to Princeton Early and have lunch. Try to park somewhere along the middle of the route, have lunch, then walk over to the Whole Earth Center. The Whole Earth Center also serves up some good lunch dishes.
Our color theme for the March is red and black. Here are some good organic cotton t’s: http://tinyurl.com/lzynda2

Can you help us out? We can also use a sound system for our end point rally. If anyone can help please email Therlam@yahoo.com

It’s time to take back our food rights!
http://www.march-against-monsanto.com/

- See more at: http://www.march-against-monsanto.com/2013/04/why-do-we-march.html#sthash.B04PLxCo.dpuf

See you at the market! – Slow Food USA

National Farmers Market Week kicks off this Sunday, August 4 and runs through Saturday, August 10. I hope you will join me for this year’s celebration at your local market. Of all food system innovations in the U.S. in the last 20 years, the resurgence of farmers markets may represent the most important DIY expression of community involvement and reinvention. In small town squares and big city centers, farmers markets delicately balance new food innovation with old food traditions. These community-centered markets celebrate the dignity of labor that brings nourishment from field to fork, and provide a safe haven for newcomers to become old friends. When roaming your market this week leaves you hungry to do more, take your support of Slow Food values to the next level… Host a “Grow” DinnerUse the five principles of Oxfam’s “Grow Method” to plan your meal 1 reduce food waste, 2 cook and buy food efficiently, 3 buy only what’s in season/local, 4 reduce meat consumption, and 5 buy products that benefit small-scale producers. Have a “Meatless Monday”Give up meat one day a week with these top 10 seasonal recipes from our friends at Meatless Monday. Eating less meat and more nutrient-rich vegetables can help reduce your risk of cancer, heart disease, diabetes and obesity – and save water and fossil fuels, too. The more we can connect these environmental issues to our everyday choices, the more effective we can be in changing the future of food in this country. See you at the market!

via Email – See you at the market? – Slow Food USA.

Why you should help get film GMO OMG into theaters | New Hope 360 Blog

Seifert and producer Joshua Kunau secured funding, and created perhaps the most beautiful food movie I’ve ever

Why you should help get film "GMO OMG" into theaters

seen.“GMO OMG” is a film that the natural foods industry desperately needs. Whereas other GMO-focused documentaries are overtly scientific and technical, such as Jeffery Smith’s “Genetic Roulette”, “GMO OMG” is inspirational and designed for people who don’t religiously shop at natural retailers. This is illuminated at the beginning of the film, when Seifert asks pedestrians if they’ve ever eaten a GMO. Most people don’t know what they are, and are surprised, even appalled to learn that they’re omnipresent in nearly all processed food.

Emotional connection

But what’s so interesting about the film is Seifert’s journey to teach his (adorable) children about GMOs—a seemingly tough concept to grasp for adults, let alone 6-year-olds. He takes his kids into grocery stores, through drive-thru windows and on a road trip across the United States, teaching them what makes GMOs different from other seeds. It’s remarkable to see young children trying to comprehend the GMO issue.

Seifert films through the lens of a concerned parent, which, I think, will make it so much more salient to viewers. It humanizes the non-GMO movement because it stokes our innate parental protectiveness.

It’s also notable that Seifert interviews both organic farmers and farmers who use GMOs. He allows them equal screen time to foster an honest discussion about the morals and implications of using genetically engineered seeds. We see GMO farmers filling the reservoir of their tractors with Roundup and atrazine—an image most Americans (this one included) have never seen if they grew up in urban or suburban settings.

One farmer points out a giant glyphosate-resistant ragweed on the edge of his farm, and relates that his whole field would be covered in the “stuff” if he didn’t use Roundup. “Can you eat that?” jokes Seifert.

The most moving part of the movie was when Seifert allowed his children to Trick-or-Treat during Halloween. Afterwards, he films his kids pooling their Reese’s Peanut Butter Cups, Snickers and Skittles in big piles. They look exuberant as they sort and trade their candy—a memory many of us share.

The largest problem, Seifert explains, is that “opting out of GMOs is opting out of American culture.” GMOs are everywhere, and if parents want to avoid them they run the risk of depriving their kids childhood joys. “Who doesn’t want to buy their kids a treat from the ice cream truck on a hot day?” he asks.

The film is symbolic, moving, atmospherically gorgeous and a call to action. And it’s in the interest of the natural products industry to help it get into theaters. This, my friends, is the next iteration of Supersize Me.

Go to Nature’s Path Facebook page or the film’s website to donate.

via Why you should help get film GMO OMG into theaters | New Hope 360 Blog.