Support Pouring from Princeton Businesses to Hurricane Sandy’s Victims

Princeton, NJ (January 8, 2013) – In support of the victims devastated by Hurricane Sandy, the Princeton business community joined together on November 20th and created the Princeton Hurricane Sandy Relief Drive.

 Fifty-four businesses in the Princeton Community participated by donating a percentage of their sales from the dedicated day, which resulted in over $36,000 in donations. This generous amount was distributed to charities such as the “Hurricane Sandy NJ Relief Fund” and “Restore Our Shore,” benefiting those most affected in New Jersey’s coastal areas.

 In an outpouring of support – from restaurants to retail shops, media companies and more – the area’s local businesses donated more than just dollars. Other contributions included advertising, printing, radio airtime and graphic designs. That, along with the percentage of sales earned that day, enabled the drive to donate the monies to much needed families.

 “We are grateful to all of the local businesses who helped support this effort and are proud to be part of such a giving community,” said Jack Morrison, President, JM Group, who organized the drive.

 Though the hurricane happened months ago, families continue to suffer. Rebuilding will take time, and money, and community efforts such as the Princeton Hurricane Sandy Relief Drive, is merely one way to offer assistance to those in need.

Participating businesses:

inceton, NJ (January 8, 2013) – In support of the victims devastated by Hurricane Sandy, the Princeton business community joined together on November 20th and created the Princeton Hurricane Sandy Relief Drive.

Fifty-four businesses in the Princeton Community participated by donating a percentage of their sales from the dedicated day, which resulted in over $36,000 in donations. This generous amount was distributed to charities such as the “Hurricane Sandy NJ Relief Fund” and “Restore Our Shore,” benefitting those most affected in New Jersey’s coastal areas.

In an outpouring of support – from restaurants to retail shops, media companies and more – the area’s local businesses donated more than just dollars. Other contributions included advertising, printing, radio airtime and graphic designs. That, along with the percentage of sales earned that day, enabled the drive to donate the monies to much needed families.

“We are grateful to all of the local businesses who helped support this effort and are proud to be part of such a giving community,” said Jack Morrison, President, JM Group, who organized the drive.

Though the hurricane happened months ago, families continue to suffer. Rebuilding will take time, and money, and community efforts such as the Princeton Hurricane Sandy Relief Drive, is merely one way to offer assistance to those in need.

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PARTICIPATING PARTNERS:

Agricola

Alchemist & Barrister

Blue Point Grill

Callaway Henderson – Sotheby’s International Realty

Carter & Cavero

Chambers Walk Café & Catering

Cranbury Station Galleries

D’Angelo Italian Market

elements

Eno Terra

FLM Graphics

Hinkson’s

Ivy Inn

Jane

Jazam’s

La Jolie Salon & Spa

MacLean Agency

Main Street

McCaffrey’s

Mediterra

Nassau Inn Yankee Doodle Tap Room

Nassau Street Seafood & Produce Company

Olives

ONE 53

Palmer Square Management

Princeton Corkscrew

Princeton Farmer’s Market

Princeton Mattress

Princeton Merchants Association

Princeton Online

Princeton Record Exchange

Princeton Regional Chamber of Commerce

Princeton Scoop

Princeton Tour Company

Princeton University Store

Rouge

Smith’s Ace Hardware

Ten Thousand Villages Princeton

Teresa Caffe

Terra Libri

Terra Momo Bread Company

The Bank of Princeton

The Bent Spoon

The Peacock Inn

The Princeton Packet

Town Topics

Triumph Brewing Company

Whole Earth Center

Winberie’s Restaurant & Bar

Witherspoon Bread Company

Witherspoon Grill

WPST

Your Town Tube

Zoe

Towards an energy-positive food system « Path 2 Resilience by Eric Garza

“Food activism of all sorts –centered on the availability of un-pasteurized dairy products, meat butchered on the farm where it was raised, and direct-to-consumer sales of products that currently require inspection or certification – is rising up throughout American society like a wellspring. This wellspring is creating an enormous opportunity, both to create new food products and markets, but also to ask deep, profound questions about our food system’s development and whether its path is a viable one over the long term. What good is a food system, after all, if its high energy intensity eventually sends the nation spiraling into both nutritional and energetic poverty?” Read Eric’s article

About the Author, Eric Garza
Eric Garza received his PhD from the University of Vermont in 2011. He consults in the energy, agriculture and food sectors and teaches courses in environmental pollution, energy systems and food systems at the University of Vermont. He manages the Path2Resilience.com website. For permission to reprint this essay, contact the author at Eric@Path2Resilience.com.

“My flexible schedule allows me to be deeply involved in my community. I’m one of three primary organizers of my local chapter of the Weston A. Price Foundation, and I’m also the treasurer of the Mad Robin Callers Collective, a local group who promotes traditional contra dancing and organizes a variety of local dances and events. I volunteer with a range of community organizations, most notably the Intervale Center, a local organization that runs a range of innovative programs to promote small-scale, organic, localized food systems. Beyond my community involvement, I enjoy practicing and teaching ancestral skills, hunting, fishing, foraging wild edible plants, spending copious amounts of time outdoors, and generally relishing life.” read more about Eric

via Towards an energy-positive food system « Path 2 Resilience.

5 MORE Things To Know About The Fight Against GMOs -Michelle Jacobson

PictureUntil recently, GMOs was an unfamiliar acronym to most Americans. Genetically modified and genetically engineered were scientific terms that seemed to belong in a laboratory, not a supermarket, kitchen, or pastoral farming locale. Our farms, we thought, were a place where Mother Nature held absolute dominion.

Well, enter the 21st century, folks. Many farms may as well be laboratories these days, with each hole dug in the ground akin to a test tube, as the seeds that are pla
For the American people (yes, specifically, the American people) to be kept unaware of what their food is comprised of – in these days of local, organic and sustainable sensibilities – is a serious travesty. Beyond that, it’s just plain dishonest.nted are not always natural, as forged by nature; often they’ve been tampered with to conform to mans’ will.

My first article, 5 Things You Need To Know About GMOs Right Now (1), was a primer for anyone seeking to know the basic facts about GMOs. Things were moving at a slow rumble until 2012, and I was trying to inform people so they’d be in the know when the hoopla started to get louder. And get louder it did.

This article picks up where that one left off, covering the vast amount of activity which has transpired across the country in the past few months, both in town halls and town squares. I can assure you that when you read this information you’ll be concerned and outraged enough to want to take control over the food you eat, once again. How can you turn away now?

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1 – How do you know the difference between a food that’s genetically modified and a food that isn’t? read more

via Michele Jacobson – GMO Blog.