Chipotle to Build 100 School Gardens with Slow Food USA – Eater

The burrito chain is putting $500,000 towards the program. That’s a lot of burritos.

Chipotle is partnering with Slow Food USA to build and support 100 school gardens across the country. According to a press release, the two companies hope to teach kids “where food comes from and how it is prepared.” Chipotle will donate around $500,000 to the cause and, will offer funding to the schools through micro-grants and fundraisers at Chipotle locations.

Local Slow Food USA chapters will provide a “customized curriculum, funding, labor, and other resources to match the needs of the individual schools.” The school gardens will be built in 10 metropolitan areas including Boston, Denver, and Phoenix.

Chipotle has a history of partnering with organizations to teach kids about nutrition. Back in 2012 the burrito chain teamed up with Veggie U to distribute gardening kits to school throughout the country to “show kids the importance of nutrition and agriculture.”

via Chipotle to Build 100 School Gardens with Slow Food USA – Eater.

West Windsor Community Winter Farmers Markets for Slow Food Central New Jersey 2015

Next Market Saturday March 14, 10:00-2:00

Organized by the West Windsor Community Farmers Market for

Slow Food Central New Jersey

In collaboration with the organizers of the West Windsor Community Farmers Market, Slow Food Central New Jersey is proud to announce its tenth season of indoor winter markets.  Visit the market at the D&R Greenway LandTrust in Princeton to discover the season’s best local foods.

slow food markets

Vendor List Updated 3/3/2015
SATURDAY, 3/14 10:00-2:00, D&R Greenway Land Trust’s Johnson Education Center, One Preservation Place, Princeton
Beechtree Farm
Birds & Bees Farm
Bobolink Dairy & Bakehouse
Cherry Grove Farm
Chickadee Creek Farm
Davidson Exotic Mushrooms
Frank’s Pickled Peppers
Fulper Family Farmstead
Happy Wanderer Bakery
Hopewell Valley Vineyards
Jams by Kim
O Made Granola
Shibumi Farm
Terhune Orchards
The Artisan Tree
Valley Shepherd Creamery
WoodsEdge Wools Farm
Hard to find winter vegetables, mushrooms, grass fed beef, lamb, honey, variety of cheese, yogurt, bread, baked goods, granola, jam, pickles, salsa, woven fiber products, soap, wine, and more.  Music by Mountainview.  Call 609-933-4452 for additional information.



After mother’s death, Franklin Twp. woman finds comfort as Thanksgiving turkey farmer |

Jessica Isbrecht carried her bathroom scale into a farm field adjacent to the Negri-Nepote turkey+Green+Duchess+Farm.jpgNative Grassland Preserve in Franklin Township and weighed herself on Election Day. She then rounded up the 51 heritage breed turkeys she raised at Green Duchess Farm this season, picked them up individually and weighed herself with them in her arms.

Ultimately, she lifted over 700 pounds.

Although Isbrecht is a third generation farmer, 2014 was her first season at her own farm. She left her family farm in Warren County in 2000, received a B.S. in Biology from University of Delaware and worked as an environmental consultant. Her mother succumbed to a battle with a rare form of lymphoma in 2013. Reeling from the loss and the knowledge this type of blood cancer is hereditary, Isbrecht realized life is short and chose to return to the farming lifestyle she loves.

“ Isn’t it sad how a tragic loss or some tragic event has to happen to make you look at your life and decide that you want to be happy? “ she asked.

Her own happiness has remarkably grown and taken flight with these turkeys. Thinking back over the season she realized, “Being around these animals has been so much fun for me and such a joy which I didn’t expect. I loved spending time with them and watching them.”

“I chose to raise them to try to educate people about the importance of our food system and where our meat is coming from and how it is raised. A lot of people are not as aware as I think they would be,” she said thoughtfully.

Isbrecht settled on raising theBourbon Red turkey, a heritage breed that came close to being extinct after the broad breasted white turkey become the most consumed breed in North America. The Bourbon Red is known for having excellent flavor and foraging capabilities.

Before deciding to raise the breed, though, she had never actually tasted it. She got her chance in September, when she was forced to harvest an injured turkey earlier than expected.

“The turkey that I ate tasted excellent. It is rich flavored. The white meat is closer in proportion to the dark meat. The breasts are not large and round like the grocery store turkeys,” she said.

Isbrecht credits their unique diet for their flavor, adding: “They really have a terroir like in wine.”

At the beginning of the season, Isbrecht admits to being a bit of a mother hen. She checked on them incessantly. Turkey chicks, or poults, need more care during the brooding process than chickens, which she also raises.

Green Duchess Farm is taking orders for turkeys at its website. Choose a fresh small turkey, 7-9 lbs, $80; medium turkey – 10-15 lbs, $120;
large turkey, 16-20 lb, $155. The thirty pounder, extra large turkeys that she struggled to weigh on the scale are sold out.

Read full article: After mother’s death, Franklin Twp. woman finds comfort as Thanksgiving turkey farmer |

The Third Plate by Dan Barber

Have you read “The Third Plate” Yet? Dan Barber is a chef that has really been paying attention on how to source and cook ethically grown really good tasting food. 

The Third Plate
“The Third Plate is grounded in the history of American cuisine over the last two centuries. Traditionally, we have dined on the “first plate,” a classic meal centered on a large cut of meat with few vegetables. Thankfully, that’s become largely passé. The farm-to-table movement has championed the “second plate,” where the meat is from free-range animals and the vegetables are locally sourced. It’s better-tasting, and better for the planet, but the second plate’s architecture is identical to that of the first. It, too, is damaging—disrupting the ecological balances of the planet, causing soil depletion and nutrient loss—and in the end it isn’t a sustainable way to farm or eat.

The solution, explains Barber, lies in the “third plate”: an integrated system of vegetable, grain, and livestock production that is fully supported—in fact, dictated—by what we choose to cook for dinner. The third plate is where good farming and good food intersect.

-The Third Plate.

PEFF Special Event “FED UP” Tonight at 7:30 in Princeton

At the Garden Theater

PEFF Special Event: "FED UP"


Oct 2 2014 - 7:30pm - 9:00pm


The Garden Theatre, 160 Nassau Street

Upending conventional wisdom on weight gain and loss, this hard-hitting documentary exposes a dirty secret of the American food industry – far more of us get sick from what we eat than anyone has previously realized. Filmmaker Stephanie Soechtig and TV journalist Katie Couric uncover why American children will now live shorter lives than their parents.

A discussion facilitated by NOFA NJ Executive Director Camille Miller will follow the screening.

Tickets: $8 General; $6 Members and Students. Please purchase online at or at the theater box office.

Presented in association with the Princeton Environmental Film Festival, The Garden Theatre, NOFA-NJ and The Terra Momo Restaurant Group.

Before and after the screening, Mediterra Restaurant, 29 Hulfish Street, will offer a special three-course prix fixe menu reflecting the spirit of the film. Call 609-252-9680 to reserve. For details visit

NOFA-NJ Fall Harvest Dinner

Join us in celebrating the season with all local food, wines, beer, desserts, drinks from the great Garden State!

Harvest Dinner 2014 Invitation

Harvest Dinner 2014

The Evening will include:

  • Cocktail hour
  • Wines and craft beers
  • Farm-to-Table tastings from over a dozen of New Jersey’s finest restaurants
  • Dessert room of pastries, ice cream and coffee
  • Music and dancing
  • Silent Auction

For more information and to register visit NOFA-NJ

via Fall Harvest Dinner.

Jersey Fresh|Pick Your Own Fruits & Vegetables

The growing season is not over yet! Here are some resources from the Jersey Fresh website to help you find fresh local produce. The key is to buy a lot of what is in season and preserve or store it so that it lasts through the winter. Some of what is still in season includes peppers, cabbage, cauliflower, broccoli, collards, pumpkin & winter squash, beets, lettuce and apples.

Let’s continue to support our local farmers!

Pick Your Own Fruits & Vegetables

Call Ahead To Avoid Disappointment

Slow Food USA: A Future for Food that May be Hard to Digest

By Carlo Petrini, Founder and President of Slow Food

What would you say to your neighbor if he and the other residents of your housing complex informed you (with your only notice the demolition crew in front of your house) that he and the others have decided to raze the building and there is nothing you can do about it? This might seem an odd question, yet it might be useful to ask oneself: Can democracy justify an individual’s ability to make decisions for others, without the interested parties’ participation in the discussion?

The governments of modern countries are the delegates of the world’s housing complex. What happens if they make a decision that doesn’t resonate with the majority of the citizens they represent, or if it jeopardizes freedom of choice for oneself and one’s children? Those decisions, then, should not only be able to be freely discussed, but should, at the very least, be allowed to be made public.

This is what terrifies me about the imminent ratification of the transatlantic trade agreement TTIP (one of those common cryptic acronyms- Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership). If passed, our everyday food system, which already lends itself to drastic and surreptitious change, will continue to become even more disconnected from the purview of the people.

The treaty is proclaimed an extraordinary economic growth opportunity, one which would foster economic growth and magically make both Europe and the US richer. I say magically, because Nobel Prize winner in Economics Joseph Stiglitz wrote openly that the theory that if the upper class becomes even richer the entire society benefits is simply a lie. The free trade agreements, from NAFTA on, have not actually lead to an increase in a quality of life for small producers and those at an economic disadvantage, but have only multiplied the earnings of the richest speculators.

read more Slow Food USA: A Future for Food that May be Hard to Digest.

Love Sustainable Ag? Work at WoodsEdge Wools–they’re hiring!

WoodsEdge Wools Farm is looking for personable, responsible, outgoing, hard-working, reliable individuals who enjoy being outdoors, interacting with people and love farming!

WoodsEdge_2014 Hiring

Applicants must appreciate local food, sustainable agriculture and enjoy working with people and interacting with customers at farmers markets. They must also be enthused about our local farm products made from our alpaca and llama fiber, honey from our beehives and the farm to table movement which includes our farm raised yak meat.

Current Available Employment Opportunities Include:
Part-time, Seasonal and Year-Round Jobs.

Farmers’ Market Help Needed:
Sales Associates at Markets
Market Van Loaders
Market Van Inventory Control

Other Farm Jobs:
Fencing and Grounds Maintenance

Download an employment application: WoodsEdge is Hiring!