Support Pouring from Princeton Businesses to Hurricane Sandy’s Victims

Princeton, NJ (January 8, 2013) – In support of the victims devastated by Hurricane Sandy, the Princeton business community joined together on November 20th and created the Princeton Hurricane Sandy Relief Drive.

 Fifty-four businesses in the Princeton Community participated by donating a percentage of their sales from the dedicated day, which resulted in over $36,000 in donations. This generous amount was distributed to charities such as the “Hurricane Sandy NJ Relief Fund” and “Restore Our Shore,” benefiting those most affected in New Jersey’s coastal areas.

 In an outpouring of support – from restaurants to retail shops, media companies and more – the area’s local businesses donated more than just dollars. Other contributions included advertising, printing, radio airtime and graphic designs. That, along with the percentage of sales earned that day, enabled the drive to donate the monies to much needed families.

 “We are grateful to all of the local businesses who helped support this effort and are proud to be part of such a giving community,” said Jack Morrison, President, JM Group, who organized the drive.

 Though the hurricane happened months ago, families continue to suffer. Rebuilding will take time, and money, and community efforts such as the Princeton Hurricane Sandy Relief Drive, is merely one way to offer assistance to those in need.

Participating businesses:

inceton, NJ (January 8, 2013) – In support of the victims devastated by Hurricane Sandy, the Princeton business community joined together on November 20th and created the Princeton Hurricane Sandy Relief Drive.

Fifty-four businesses in the Princeton Community participated by donating a percentage of their sales from the dedicated day, which resulted in over $36,000 in donations. This generous amount was distributed to charities such as the “Hurricane Sandy NJ Relief Fund” and “Restore Our Shore,” benefitting those most affected in New Jersey’s coastal areas.

In an outpouring of support – from restaurants to retail shops, media companies and more – the area’s local businesses donated more than just dollars. Other contributions included advertising, printing, radio airtime and graphic designs. That, along with the percentage of sales earned that day, enabled the drive to donate the monies to much needed families.

“We are grateful to all of the local businesses who helped support this effort and are proud to be part of such a giving community,” said Jack Morrison, President, JM Group, who organized the drive.

Though the hurricane happened months ago, families continue to suffer. Rebuilding will take time, and money, and community efforts such as the Princeton Hurricane Sandy Relief Drive, is merely one way to offer assistance to those in need.

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PARTICIPATING PARTNERS:

Agricola

Alchemist & Barrister

Blue Point Grill

Callaway Henderson – Sotheby’s International Realty

Carter & Cavero

Chambers Walk Café & Catering

Cranbury Station Galleries

D’Angelo Italian Market

elements

Eno Terra

FLM Graphics

Hinkson’s

Ivy Inn

Jane

Jazam’s

La Jolie Salon & Spa

MacLean Agency

Main Street

McCaffrey’s

Mediterra

Nassau Inn Yankee Doodle Tap Room

Nassau Street Seafood & Produce Company

Olives

ONE 53

Palmer Square Management

Princeton Corkscrew

Princeton Farmer’s Market

Princeton Mattress

Princeton Merchants Association

Princeton Online

Princeton Record Exchange

Princeton Regional Chamber of Commerce

Princeton Scoop

Princeton Tour Company

Princeton University Store

Rouge

Smith’s Ace Hardware

Ten Thousand Villages Princeton

Teresa Caffe

Terra Libri

Terra Momo Bread Company

The Bank of Princeton

The Bent Spoon

The Peacock Inn

The Princeton Packet

Town Topics

Triumph Brewing Company

Whole Earth Center

Winberie’s Restaurant & Bar

Witherspoon Bread Company

Witherspoon Grill

WPST

Your Town Tube

Zoe

Llama Llama?


By Nirit Yadin
(
The  title is dedicated to the few who know some Hebrew. Llama means “why” and therefore, “llama llama?” means Why Llama?…Ok, let’s move on.)

I got llama steaks at the Slow Food Central New Jersey Winter Farmers Market. I met Pat Tanner who said that the guy from WoodsEdge Farms is selling llama meat alongside his alpaca sweaters. So I went and there it was, a blue cooler filled with llama meat.

I got steaks.  They were dark Burgundy with very little fat veins and a peculiarly delicate bone in the middle.  I asked Chef Chris Albrecht to cook them, just to be on the safe side.

Chris seared the steaks on both sides, and cooked to a perfect medium-rare while basting  with some herbed butter. The result was delicious: flavorful but fairly mild, the texture just firm enough to enjoy a good chewing.

If you run into llama meat (they are available from WoodsEdge Farms) try this recipe. You can also enjoy Pat Tanner’s suggestions.

Llama Steaks

1-2 llama steaks (if frozen, thaw overnight in the fridge and in any case let them sit at room temperature 45 minutes to an hour before cooking)
Salt and pepper
2 tablespoon butter for basting, if you have herbed butter, better yet.
You will need a heavy pan that can fit the steaks while leaving about an inch of space between them, or – if cooking only one steak – between the steak and the pan edge.

Wipe the steak dry with paper towels, rub with some olive oil.
Set a heavy-bottomed pan on top of the stove over high heat. Heat the pan on high heat until it just smokes, then sizzle in some olive oil. Sprinkle one side of the steaks with salt and grind some pepper.

Add your steaks to the pan, seasoned side down. Salt and pepper the upper side. Leave the heat on high. Cook like this for about 3 minutes, without touching them. (The more you move them around, the more you’ll inhibit a nice crust from forming.)

Reduce the heat  to medium-low and cook for about 3 minutes.

Add about a tablespoon of the butter to the pan. When the butter melts, scape any brown bits from the bottom of the pan and drizzle the butter on the steaks. Remove the steak from the pan and crank the flame up to high again. Return the steak to the pan, uncooked side down and repeat the process.

Remove the steaks from the pan and let rest 5 minutes before slicing.