West Windsor Community Farmers Market Opens May 3

The West Windsor Community Farmers Market (WWCFM) is pleased to announce the opening of its 2014 farmers market season. Beginning May 3rd and continuing through to November 22 (rain or shine!), the Market will be open on Saturdays from 9:00am-1:00pm.

The Market hosts 15 farms and 11 artisan food and natural product vendors in its 2014
line up. Local fruits, vegetables, meats, dairy, eggs, woven fibers, soap, baked goods,
flowers, honey, sauces, jams, fresh juices, crepes and more can be found at the market
each week.

New vendors to the Market this year include Shibumi Mushroom Farm, Frank’s Pickled
Peppers, and Good Enough For Kids.

In addition to other weekly cooking demonstrations by local chefs, the Market is
proud to offer this season a monthly cooking basics series, on the second Saturday of
each month, featuring simple, seasonal cooking and preparation techniques demonstrated by board members and/or the market manager.

The Market is located in the Vaughn Drive Parking Lot of the southbound side of the
Princeton Junction Train Station, one mile from the Alexander Road and Route 1
intersection. Parking is free. For directions to the market, up to date weekly event listings and complete list of vendors, please visit our website at www.westwindsorfarmersmarket.org.
For more information, call 609 933-4452 or emailwwcfm@yahoo.com.

May events include:
MAY 3: OPENING DAY!
• MUSIC: Ed Goldberg & The Odessa Klezmer Band
• COMMUNITY GROUPS:
WWBPA (West Windsor Bike and Pedestrian Alliance): Annual opening day
walk from Maurice Hawk School
WWAC (West Windsor Arts Council)
• PRINCETON HEALTHCARE SYSTEM: Free Blood Pressure Screenings
• COOKING DEMO: Allie O’Brien
• MASSAGE: The Touch That Heals

MAY 10:
• MUSIC: Ed Goldberg & The Odessa Klezmer Band
• COOKING DEMO: WWCFM Cooking Basics

MAY 17:
• MUSIC: The Jackalopes
• COMMUNITY GROUPS:
WWBPA (West Windsor Bike and Pedestrian Alliance)
EASTERN SERVICE WORKERS
• PRINCETON HEALTHCARE SYSTEM: Free Blood Pressure Screenings
• MASSAGE: The Touch That Heals

MAY 31:
• COMMUNITY GROUP:
WWBPA (West Windsor Bike and Pedestrian Alliance)
• PRINCETON HEALTHCARE SYSTEM: Free Blood Pressure Screenings
• COOKING DEMO: Dorothy Mullen (Suppers Program)
• MASSAGE: The Touch That Heals

Slow Food USA: A Future for Food that May be Hard to Digest

By Carlo Petrini, Founder and President of Slow Food

What would you say to your neighbor if he and the other residents of your housing complex informed you (with your only notice the demolition crew in front of your house) that he and the others have decided to raze the building and there is nothing you can do about it? This might seem an odd question, yet it might be useful to ask oneself: Can democracy justify an individual’s ability to make decisions for others, without the interested parties’ participation in the discussion?

The governments of modern countries are the delegates of the world’s housing complex. What happens if they make a decision that doesn’t resonate with the majority of the citizens they represent, or if it jeopardizes freedom of choice for oneself and one’s children? Those decisions, then, should not only be able to be freely discussed, but should, at the very least, be allowed to be made public.

This is what terrifies me about the imminent ratification of the transatlantic trade agreement TTIP (one of those common cryptic acronyms- Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership). If passed, our everyday food system, which already lends itself to drastic and surreptitious change, will continue to become even more disconnected from the purview of the people.

The treaty is proclaimed an extraordinary economic growth opportunity, one which would foster economic growth and magically make both Europe and the US richer. I say magically, because Nobel Prize winner in Economics Joseph Stiglitz wrote openly that the theory that if the upper class becomes even richer the entire society benefits is simply a lie. The free trade agreements, from NAFTA on, have not actually lead to an increase in a quality of life for small producers and those at an economic disadvantage, but have only multiplied the earnings of the richest speculators.

read more Slow Food USA: A Future for Food that May be Hard to Digest.