HERE’S A PUBLIC HEALTH PLAN TO SAVE RAW MILK DRINKERS FROM THEMSELVES–David Gumpert

“Take me to your leader.”

I couldn’t help thinking of that cliche from old cowboy-Indian-style movies, as I listened to a recent podcast by two professors of food safety discussing raw milk (this is the podcast Joseph Heckman originally provided a link to; it’s the last 25 minutes that are most relevant to raw milk risk and safety).

The two professors are Don Schaffner of Rutgers University and Ben Chapman of North Carolina State University. Schaffner is also president of the International Association of Food Protection, one of the largest educational organizations around food safety. They regularly discuss various aspects of food safety, and this week chose to focus on how to more effectively alert raw milk drinkers about the dangers of the product.ened to a recent podcast by two professors of food safety discussing raw milk (this is the podcast Joseph Heckman originally provided a link to; it’s the last 25 minutes that are most relevant to raw milk risk and safety).

“This product is risky,” said Schaffner. “We have to figure out a better way to get to the people with that risk information.”

Giving the professors new hope, they gushed, was the recent Minnesota study on raw milk (sponsored by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control)–the one that estimated that more than 20,000 people got sick from raw milk between 2001 and 2010, versus the 21 reported.

“Kudos to the people in Minnesota who carried out that study….it’s a fascinating piece of work,” said Schaffner, who is taken by its confirmation (to him) of the huge risk associated with drinking raw milk. It seems so obvious to the professors that not only is raw milk terribly dangerous, but that anyone who chooses to drink it must be completely uninformed….or just plain weird.

After all, how could anyone not understand? “It’s going to be hard to reach them” (these hardcore raw milk drinkers), bemoaned Schaffner.

Read more Saving Raw Milk Drinkers from Themselves.

 

Dine With Pat | NJ Slow Food Winter Markets

It’s That Time Again: Slow Food Winter Farmers Markets

Saturday, January 11: From 11 am to 3 pm at Tre Piani restaurant, Forrestal Village, Princeton. Vendors: BeechTree Farm, Birds & Bees Farm Honey, Cherry Grove Farm, Chickadee Creek Farm, Davidson’s Exotic Mushrooms, Donna & Company Chocolates, Elijah’s Promise Bakery, Happy Wanderer Bakery, Judith’s Desserts, Nice & Sharp Knife Sharpening Service, Rocky Brook Farm, Shibumi Mushroom Farm, Trappers Honey, Valley Shepherd Creamery, WoodsEdge Wools Farm. Directions at trepiani.com ($2 suggested donation)

via Scott Anderson @ Beard House; 2 NJ Slow Food Winter Markets; “Somm” the Movie | Dine With Pat.

From Garden to Glass: Home Brewing with Your Garden Harvest Fri Jan 24th 6:30 Free Class at the E.A.R.T.H Center!

 

Brew Workshop 2014

Home Brewing Workshop at the EARTH Center

Rutgers Master Gardeners want to help you gain knowledge of home brewing at a new EARTH Center workshop called: From Garden to Glass: Home Brewing with Your Garden Harvest. Featured will be vegetables and fruits you can use in the home brewing process, such as pumpkins and figs.  The workshop takes place on Friday, January 24, at 6:30 PM, in the EARTH Center, located in Davidson’s Mill Pond Park 42 Riva Ave. South Brunswick, NJ.

Presenter Michael Klaser has been a home-brewer and amateur brew-master for 4 years. Also the editor of a home-brewing blog, Michael will lead the seminar and share his experience in this art and science. A brief overview of the different methods of making beer and discussion of the major ingredients will follow including; beer history, modern home-brewing procedures, and equipment considerations. Equipment and raw ingredients will be on display so attendees can see the tools firsthand. Resources will be available too for people to carry out their own research.

There will be plenty of time for Q&A, as new brewers often have many questions. No Walk-ins are permitted. Though this is a free workshop register at 732-398-5262 by January 22.

Even if you can’t visit the EARTH Center this season, you can still get great gardening tips by calling the Master Gardner Helpline at 732-398-5220.

If you are not familiar with your local Extension office, it is part of a nationwide network that brings the research of the state land-grant universities to local people. Rutgers Cooperative Extension offices throughout New Jersey are cooperatively funded by; the County Board of Chosen Freeholders, Rutgers University- New Jersey Agricultural Experiment Station and the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

Rutgers Cooperative Extension educational programs are offered to all without regard to race, religion, color, age, national origin, gender, sexual orientation, or disability.